Does your itchy dog need to see the veterinarian?

Frequently Asked Questions About APOQUEL

If your dog’s itching persists or you notice any of the following signs, you should make an appointment with your veterinarian to find out if the itching is caused by a medical condition:

  • Excessive licking, chewing, biting, or scratching
  • Excessive rolling, rubbing, or scooting
  • Hair loss
  • Foot chewing
  • Recurrent ear problems
  • Changes in the skin, such as sores or darkened color
  • Redness of the skin
  • Body odor
  • Head shaking

APOQUEL is not a steroid, antihistamine, or cyclosporine (a type of drug that reduces immune system activity). APOQUEL is in a different category of medications, which blocks allergic itch at the source, with fewer side effects compared with some other therapies.1-3

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not placed any time restrictions on the use of APOQUEL. You can continue to treat your dog with APOQUEL for as long as your veterinarian recommends. In studies, dogs were treated with APOQUEL for more than 2 years and showed only minimal side effects.5

Yes, APOQUEL is safe to be used with other treatments such as vaccines, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antibiotics, and other allergy medications.4 The use of APOQUEL has not been evaluated in combination with glucocorticoids, cyclosporine, or other systemic immunosuppressive agents.

APOQUEL is safe with minimal side effects. The most common side effects were vomiting and diarrhea. These occurred in only a small percentage of dogs treated with APOQUEL. These side effects typically stopped on their own.3,5

Is it time to see the veterinarian?

INDICATIONS

Control of pruritus (itching) associated with allergic dermatitis and control of atopic dermatitis in dogs at least 12 months of age.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not use APOQUEL in dogs less than 12 months of age or those with serious infections. APOQUEL may increase the chances of developing serious infections, and may cause existing parasitic skin infestations or pre-existing cancers to get worse. APOQUEL has not been tested in dogs receiving some medications including some commonly used to treat skin conditions such as corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Do not use in breeding, pregnant, or lactating dogs. Most common side effects are vomiting and diarrhea. APOQUEL has been used safely with many common medications including parasiticides, antibiotics and vaccines.

For more information, please see the full Prescribing Information.

 

References: 1. Gonzales AJ, Bowman JW, Fici GJ, Zhang M, Mann DW, Mitton-Fry M. Oclacitinib (APOQUEL®) is a novel Janus kinase inhibitor with activity against cytokines involved in allergy. J Vet Pharmacol Ther. 2014;37(4):317-324. doi: 10.1111/jvp.12101. 2. Cosgrove SB, Wren JA, Cleaver DM, et al. Efficacy and safety of oclacitinib for the control of pruritus and associated skin lesions in dogs with canine allergic dermatitis. Vet Dermatol. 2013;24(5):479-e114. doi: 10.1111/vde.12047. 3. Cosgrove SB, Wren JA, Cleaver DM, et al. A blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of the Janus kinase inhibitor oclacitinib (Apoquel®) in client-owned dogs with atopic dermatitis. Vet Dermatol. 2013;24(6):587-597, e141-142. doi: 10.1111/vde.12088. 4. Gadeyne C, Little P, King VL, Edwards N, Davis K, Stegemann MR. Efficacy of oclacitinib (Apoquel®) compared with prednisolone for the control of pruritus and clinical signs associated with allergic dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Australia. Vet Dermatol. 2014;25(6):512-518, e86. doi: 10.1111/vde.12166. 5. Cosgrove SB, Cleaver DM, King VL, et al. Long-term compassionate use of oclacitinib in dogs with atopic and allergic skin disease: safety, efficacy and quality of life. Vet Dermatol. 2015;26(3):171-179, e35.